Frequently Asked Questions

What if your question isn't answered below?
If you have any additional questions, please submit them via email ONLY to DRFP@wayne.edu and our team will get back to you within 3-4 business days. TELEPHONE CALLS TO THE DETROIT REVITALIZATION FELLOWS OFFICE ARE NOT ENCOURAGED.

Can I apply to be a Fellow? 
The Detroit Revitalization Fellows is committed to growing our network of change agents and expanding our impact. We are exploring how to further invest in doers while developing an inclusive leadership pipeline that broadens access to the fellowship and our programming.

What are the required qualifications for a candidate interested in being Detroit Revitalization Fellow?
The Detroit Revitalization Fellows is committed to growing our network of change agents and expanding our impact. We are exploring how to further invest in doers while developing an inclusive leadership pipeline that broadens access to the fellowship and our programming.

What is the employment package for a Detroit Revitalization Fellow?
Historically, Fellows have received competitive salaries and benefits packages through their individual employers, where they serve as full-time employees for the two-year term of the fellowship. Base salaries range from $53,000 to $86,000 annually (with benefits in addition). Fellows also have access to a significant amount of group leadership development training, an individual professional development coach and an individual professional training allowance.

Where do Detroit Revitalization Fellows work?
Detroit Revitalization Fellows have worked at organizations at the forefront of some Detroit's most important civic, community and economic development efforts. To date, Fellows in the first four cohorts have worked at over forty organizations in and around Detroit. A full listing of these organizations can be found at the Employers page.

Where do Fellows come from?
We aim to have a cohort that is diverse in many ways, including geographically. The best way to drive the kind of progress that Detroit needs, while remaining inclusive and addressing disparities head-on, is to ensure that opportunities and approaches incorporate a range of perspectives. Revitalization Fellows — 80 of them over the course of the last eight years — have represented three distinct groups of Detroiters: newcomers who have never lived in Detroit before, former Detroiters who are returning home and Detroiters who have chosen to stay and contribute their considerable talent in their hometown.